Prime Ark 45 Blackberry-4 Inch Pot/SPRING

Prime Ark 45 Blackberry-4 Inch Pot/SPRING

Make way for the new 'primocane' blackberry. It is larger, more productive and more flavorful than Prime Jan and Jim. This unique upright, free standing 'primocane' blackberry bears ON FIRST YEAR CANES. For some twenty years gardeners have enjoyed 'primocane' raspberries. Now, as you do with the 'everbearing' raspberries, allow the blackberries to grow for a season. Then each winter cut the canes just above the ground and allow them to grow back. At the beginning of September through the fall, simply harvest the fruit. If you wish, like the raspberries you can allow the canes to grow for a second year and they will also produce a crop in June. Prime Ark thrives in the Pacific NW and as far north as central Minnesota and New York. It is a low chill selection, however it doesn't produce well in places like the deep South, where summer temperatures are consistently above 90°F. Plants are hardy in the winter to 10°F or below zero if cut back to the ground and heavily mulched. The primocane fruit ripens in June or July, 4 days after Prime Jim and again in September, two weeks after Prime Jim.

Our price: $7.50

Catalog NumberE570
Required Zones 4 - 9
Detailed How-To-Grow Blackberries

Make way for the new 'primocane' blackberry. It is larger, more productive and more flavorful than Prime Jan and Jim. This unique upright, free standing 'primocane' blackberry bears ON FIRST YEAR CANES. For some twenty years gardeners have enjoyed 'primocane' raspberries. Now, as you do with the 'everbearing' raspberries, allow the blackberries to grow for a season. Then each winter cut the canes just above the ground and allow them to grow back. At the beginning of September through the fall, simply harvest the fruit. If you wish, like the raspberries you can allow the canes to grow for a second year and they will also produce a crop in June. Prime Ark thrives in the Pacific NW and as far north as central Minnesota and New York. It is a low chill selection, however it doesn't produce well in places like the deep South, where summer temperatures are consistently above 90°F. Plants are hardy in the winter to 10°F or below zero if cut back to the ground and heavily mulched. The primocane fruit ripens in June or July, 4 days after Prime Jim and again in September, two weeks after Prime Jim.

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